What Is Oral Sex?

Among couples of all ages and genders, oral sex is a common sexual act. Also known as oral sex or cunnilingus, this position involves oral stimulation of the partner's genitals or anus.

Before intercourse, oral sex is usually a part of foreplay. Many couples use it as a way to warm up or to have intercourse, but oral stimulation may also play a role during or after intercourse.

How Does It Work?

During oral sex, the partner needs to choose the most comfortable position for doing it. A partner stimulates the partner’s penis, vagina, or anus with his mouth, lips, or tongue. In addition to regular genital sex, oral delivery to you and your partner brings another way to please each other.

Eighty-five percent of sexually active adults between the ages of 18 and 44 said they had an oral sex with a heterosexual partner. However, it should be noted that oral entertainment is not only for heterosexual couples. People in a homosexual or heterosexual relationship can give or receive verbal stimulation with their partner.

 


How to Try Oral Sex Safely

People of all genders can have oral sex or receive oral sex, it is important to make sure that both parties agree.

Talk to your partner about trying oral sex. The first step is to communicate verbal pleasures with your partner. Some studies have shown that heterosexual women may be more reluctant to seek verbal pleasure from a male partner. However, the same study also showed that men want to have oral sex with their partners more often. 

Talk about how your partner understands how to stimulate each other through pleasure, using your mouth to stimulate such an intimate act. You can kiss and touch first, and then gradually use your mouth to your partner in a way that your partner likes.

 

Possible risks

Oral sex carries the risk of contracting STDs. If you engage in casual oral sex, use protective devices such as condoms or dental plugs. These products can protect you and your partner and reduce the possibility of acquiring sexually transmitted diseases.

If you or your partner have cuts, sores or ulcers on the mouth or genitals or around the anus, avoid oral sex until the wound is healed or treated to avoid further complications. Not all STD symptoms can be cleared immediately, and may cause fertility and general health problems.

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